30 bewildering facts about Akhenaten — Ancient Egypt’s most controversial Pharaoh » The Event Chronicle

 

By Ancient Code

Akhenaten was one of ancient Egypt’s most influential and controversial pharaohs. He is considered one of the world’s most important religious innovators.

He was a Pharaoh of the Eighteenth dynasty and he was the father of Tutankhamun, husband to Queen Nefertiti. Akhenaten claimed to be a direct descendant of Aten and regarded himself to be divine and was himself a God. He is one of the most interesting and mysterious rulers of Ancient Egypt, and here’s why:

Akhenaten was a Pharaoh of the Eighteenth dynasty of Egypt and ruled for 17 years.

Akhenaten was known as the “great heretic” due to his religious innovations.

Akhenaten was the son of Amenhotep III and Queen Tiye.

Early on in his reign, he was known as Amenhotep IV, but he changed his name to Akhenaten to reflect his close link with the new supreme deity of his making.

He was also known as `Akhenaton’ or `Ikhnaton’ and also `Khuenaten’, all of which are translated to mean `successful for’ or `of great use to’ the god Aten.

Akhenaten was married to Queen Nefertiti, one of the most famous of all ancient Egyptian women.

Nefertiti was one of the most influential queens. Paintings show her conducting religious ceremonies with Akhenaten as an equal. However, she wasn’t Akhenaten’s only wife. Kiya was also wife to Akhenaten. Little is known about her, and her actions and roles are poorly documented in the historical record.

Nefertiti’s mummy was never found. Archaeologist June Fletcher claimed she found Nefertiti’s badly-mutilated mummy in a side chamber of the Tomb of Amenhotep II in the Valley of the Kings. Most scholars are not convinced.

Akhenaten was father of both Tutankhamun (by a lesser wife named Lady Kiya) and Tutankhamun’s wife Ankhsenamun (by Nefertiti)…

Source: 30 bewildering facts about Akhenaten — Ancient Egypt’s most controversial Pharaoh » The Event Chronicle

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