Tit-for-Tat Politics, Vault 7, and the Political Distraction Game | Stillness in the Storm

Sunday, March 19, 2017

 

The Terrorist DistractionThe American people have been slowly and incrementally conditioned to accept the growing surveillance and police state, all due to some hazy fear of a verifiably manufactured danger that kills fewer people than your annual heat wave — and that is not hyperbole, it is fact. According to the National Safety Council and the National Center for Health Statistics, Americans have a 1 in 45,808chance in their lifetime of being the victim of a terrorist attack, yet this topic seemingly justifies both the domestic and foreign policy of the US (that is arguably becoming quite un-American, “the totalitarian-tip-toe”) and clearly dominates American news coverage. Whereas, in any given year, an American has a 1 in 10,785 chance of dying due to a heat wave.

“I once asked a guy at [the National Institutes of Health] how much we should spend on preventing a disease that kills 6 per year, and he looked at me like I was crazy.” — John Mueller, a foreign policy expert at the Ohio State University and co-author of the book “Chasing Ghosts: The Policing of Terrorism

The reason that self-created issues that are intrinsically harmful to the American people are essentially ignored, while being completely within our control to stop — such as the opiate epidemic which takes the life of one American every 20 minutes and is increasing with every passing day — while others are made to be headline news when in comparison their threat is almost non-existent, is due to the differing collective agenda of the ruling class. What actually comes to pass in this country has very little to do with the collective will of the American people, and almost entirely to do with the desires of a few extremely influential individuals. This was once considered “conspiracy theory”, yet today, it is essentially common knowledge, along with many other topics that were once intentionally shrouded in doubt and disbelief.

The decision as to which issues get air time in this country, and therefore gather public attention, hinges entirely on the State’s ability to use said issues to control perception and further their long-term agenda. So an issue such as the opiate epidemic is intentionally ignored (at the expense of American families), subconsciously telling all those who hear about it from independent media that it is not as serious as it’s being made out to be. In reality, however, it is the biggest issue facing Americans today.

Here’s how the lifetime odds of the most common — and feared — causes of death for Americans stack up against foreign killings (highlighted in red):

Compared to the threat posed by refugee terrorists — which the president’s executive order is allegedly designed to curtail — the data suggests the typical American is:

  • 6 times more likely to die from a shark attack (one of the rarest forms of death on Earth)
  • 29 times more likely to die from a regional asteroid strike
  • 260 times more likely to be struck and killed by lightning
  • 4,700 times more likely to die in an airplane or spaceship accident
  • 129,000 times more likely to die in a gun assault
  • 407,000 times more likely to die in a motor vehicle incident
  • 6.9 million times more likely to die from cancer or heart disease

Interestingly enough, there is no section for drug overdose or medical mistreatment/error, which are two of the largest causes of death today. So ask yourself why neither would be listed on a compilation of the ‘top causes of death?’ That in and of itself, speaks volumes…

Source: Tit-for-Tat Politics, Vault 7, and the Political Distraction Game | Stillness in the Storm

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